“Best Practices in MUN Simulations”

Welcome to the 3rd annual Global Negotiation Symposium at Kobe City University of Foreign Studies. Held concurrently with the 10th Annual International Japan University English Model United Nations (JUEMUN), June 21-23, 2019.

As well as featured speakers (TBA) and an opportunity to do a faculty lunch time Q&A session with the JUEMUN Guest Speaker ILO Director Akiko Taguchi, we are hoping that all of you will consider participating in one of the two scheduled poster sessionsduring the conference.

This year’s GNS theme is:       “Best Practices in MUN Simulations”

You are encouraged to share practices that you have used or have observed as faculty advisors that you feel are most helpful in the delegate preparation process.

Here are just a few examples to get your imagination working on the many poster presentation topics possible:

Supporting student research before MUN events

Principles for preparing MUN speeches

Speech-making do’s and don’ts

Position paper writing—how to get started

Training sessions—suggested timelines for advisors

Building autonomy in MUN delegates

Putting critical thinking skills to use in delegate preparation

Getting students interested in joining MUN events

Bringing MUN into the high school or broader community

Assessment in MUN: How to bring out the best in delegate behavior

….etc….

If you are interested, please send your poster presentation title  and a short 25-30 word abstract to Donna Tatsuki dhtatsuki@gmail.comby June 15th. I will let presenters know which session they will be featured at (Friday at tea break or Saturday dinner time) once I see the range of topics. In any case, the posters will be on display all weekend to encourage informal discussions beyond the set poster session slots.

 

Publication Opportunity!!!

After GNS 2019 we will be soliciting papers on the “Best Practices in MUN Simulations”theme and based on the poster session presentations for a special publication. More details and deadlines TBA.

 

 

Global Negotiation Symposium

“Best Practices in MUN Simulations”

Welcome to the 3rd annual Global Negotiation Symposium at Kobe City University of Foreign Studies. Held concurrently with the 10th Annual International Japan University English Model United Nations (JUEMUN), June 21-23, 2019.

As well as featured speakers (TBA) and an opportunity to do a faculty lunch time Q&A session with the JUEMUN Guest Speaker ILO Director Akiko Taguchi, we are hoping that all of you will consider participating in one of the two scheduled poster sessionsduring the conference.

This year’s GNS theme is:       “Best Practices in MUN Simulations”

You are encouraged to share practices that you have used or have observed as faculty advisors that you feel are most helpful in the delegate preparation process.

Here are just a few examples to get your imagination working on the many poster presentation topics possible:

Supporting student research before MUN events

Principles for preparing MUN speeches

Speech-making do’s and don’ts

Position paper writing—how to get started

Training sessions—suggested timelines for advisors

Building autonomy in MUN delegates

Putting critical thinking skills to use in delegate preparation

Getting students interested in joining MUN events

Bringing MUN into the high school or broader community

Assessment in MUN: How to bring out the best in delegate behavior

….etc….

If you are interested, please send your poster presentation title  and a short 25-30 word abstract to Donna Tatsuki dhtatsuki@gmail.comby June 15th. I will let presenters know which session they will be featured at (Friday at tea break or Saturday dinner time) once I see the range of topics. In any case, the posters will be on display all weekend to encourage informal discussions beyond the set poster session slots.

 

Publication Opportunity!!!

After GNS 2019 we will be soliciting papers on the “Best Practices in MUN Simulations”theme and based on the poster session presentations for a special publication. More details and deadlines TBA.

 

 

About

One of the most important the 21st century skills is the ability to negotiate constructive resolutions in the face of conflicts of interest. Negotiation is a form of communication that requires more than just language ability. It requires being able to listen to and communicate with others within a milieu of diverse language abilities, academic, professional and cultural backgrounds in an increasingly global society. Negotiation is problem solving where the bringing together of two or more parties with seemingly divergent interests requires creativity and involves the expansion of the solution choice-set to enable a win-win situation.

When negotiating in English in a multicultural and multilingual environment, Japanese are stereotypically known to adopt roles as observers rather than as active participants because they are relying on a Japanese cultural approach to negotiation. In Japanese education, problem solving and critical/creative thinking have not been valued at the core of learning and innovation. The 21st century calls for educational systems to ensure that their curriculum design and pedagogical practices emphasize and develop competencies that are crucial for successful negotiation. Our common goal is to prepare students to solve complex problems that are associated with living in a technological, competitive, and globally connected world.

This Global Negotiation Symposium will bridge theory, research and practice of negotiation in order to support teachers with practical skills, language and evaluative frameworks. The Global Negotiation Symposium provides an opportunity for researchers, negotiation practitioners, and language teachers to share their insights and best practices in order to significantly enrich the pedagogic environment for spoken interaction for both non-native and native speakers of English. Knowledge of and practical familiarization with the pragmatic norms of negotiation within relevant communities of practice is an important aspect of socialization for native speakers and foreign language learners alike. One outstanding innovation of this Global Negotiation Symposium will be workshop opportunities for participants to observe students negotiating at JUEMUN and learn about a Model United Nations simulation as a community of practice.

Registration and Contact

Register to let us know you are coming and contact us if you want more information

 

Programme-at-a-Glance

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Featured Speakers

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Prof. Dr. iur. Andreas Müglich

Professor Müglich studied law in Würzburg and Giessen. He passed the 1st state examination in 1986, 2nd state examination in 1989. He became a research assistant and completed his doctorate in 1991. Until end of 1997 he served as a civil servant in the Federal Ministry of Transportation: main areas of practice were industrial property rights, IT law and logistics law. In addition to legislative procedures, he was involved in contract negotiations in large-scale infrastructure projects. From 1997, Professor of International Business Law and Comparative Law at the Westphalian University of Applied Sciences. He is specialized in didactics of higher education and the coaching of newly appointed Lecturers.

MUN in Classroom for secondary school students

Since 2016 we have been offering an almost similar Conference to that of NMUN held in NYC for pupils at the age of 16 and older. The number of schools and participants has been steadily growing, and recently we have started to integrate pupils from Wodzislaw (Poland) and Jeglava (Latvia)/twinned counties. University students lecture and mentor pupils in peer-to-peer settings. We supply the teachers with a guide to MUNiC. In this presentation, fields of competence that are addressed during preparation and during the conference, such as, the development of competences in the fields of scientific work, vocabulary expansion, free speech, diplomatic negotiation, compromise, UN resolution writing and multicultural understanding, are identified. Furthermore, the presentation will provide information, on the basis of experiences at NMUN NYC how such a project can be integrated into everyday teaching life. It also encourages reflection on the role that teachers can play in such a format.

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Michiko Kuroda

Prof. M. Kuroda worked for the United Nations for 30 years in Genera, New York and Timor-Leste.  She was the Chief of Staff of UN peacekeeping and peacebuilding operations in Timor-Leste. Since 2012, she has been teaching at the International Relations and Diplomacy Program (IRDP) at Mercy College, including teaching the Model United Nations, bringing awards to the team.  Currently she is also an UN Executive Coach and an UNDP Peacebuilding Adviser.  She holds MA in international relations with concentration on international law. Her publications include Early Warning and Conflict Resolution (co-editor), McMillan & St. Martin’s Press, London & New York, 1992.

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Thomas Weiler

Prof. Thomas Weiler teaches Law and Political Sciences at the
University of Applied Sciences of the State of North-Rhine Westphalia at Cologne, and the University of Bonn. He studied Law, Political Science New History, Scandinavian Science at Universität des Saarlandes; University of Lund; Harvard University; Rheinische Friedrich- Wilhelms-Universität. He is the President of United Nations Association of Germany, a Member of the NMUN-NY Advisory Group (USA), a Member of the Center for Global Studies/Institut für Politische Wissenschaft und Soziologie, Bonn University (Germany).

Enabling your team to be well-prepared

Preparing for MUNs throws together a group of students into a project combining the content of various seminars: Learning about the UN & the country/NGO/IGO you will represent, rhetorical skills, rules of the simulation, and English skills. How does one best combine these aspects into one schedule?

  • English from the get-go
  • Emphatic learning (choose your favorite SDG – what interests YOU?!)
  • Get students to talk, talk, talk!
  • Simulate as often as you can and as early as you can – concentrate on rules first, content later
  • Have your group meet other groups (e.g. for prep-sims)
  • Be aware of group dynamics
  • Include tutors (students with experience from last years)

NEWS

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